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Le Navigateur linguistique cherche simultanément dans tous les outils d’aide à la rédaction, jeux et billets de blogue du Portail linguistique du Canada. Il vous donne accès à tout ce dont vous avez besoin pour bien écrire en français et en anglais : articles sur des difficultés de langue, recommandations linguistiques, tableaux de conjugaison, suggestions de traductions et bien plus.

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Résultats 1 à 10 de 64 (page 1 de 7)

Peaceable pronouns

A quiz on pronoun agreement in English.Pronouns are peaceable creatures—they like to agree with the words they refer to (called their antecedents). English pronouns should agree with their antecedents in gender, number and person. To test your knowledge of pronoun agreement, pick the answer that is best in formal writing for each question below.1. of the ballroom dance club brought dues.Each member, hisEach member, his or herAll the members, their2. Gloria and Hugh have loaned us bathing suits.ourtheirhis or her3. Because Canadians come from so many varied backgrounds, we have learned to value diversity.This sentence is correct.This sentence contains a shift in person.This sentence contains a shift in number.4. Choose the correct sentence:None of the dogs has lost its collar.None of the dogs have lost their collars.both are correct5. Every one of the student nurses passed exams.herourthe6. The company benefited by marketing products online.itstheirhis or her7. on the committee expressed opinion on the proposal.Everyone, hisAll the people, theirEvery man and woman, her8. Neither the children nor their father had picture taken.histheirour9. Ontario voters must cast ballots before the polls close tonight.yourourtheir10. None of the Girl Guides forgot lines in the skit.theirherour  
Source : Jeux du Portail linguistique du Canada
Nombre de consultations : 129 431

Subject-verb agreement: Indefinite pronouns

An English quiz in which the user must decide if the verb after the indefinite pronoun should be singular or pluralShould the verb that follows an indefinite pronoun be singular or plural? Well, it depends! Some indefinite pronouns are always singular and therefore take a singular verb, while others are always plural and therefore take a plural verb. But some can be either singular or plural depending on the context. How confusing!See if you can choose the verb form that goes with the indefinite pronouns in the sentences below. If you’re stuck, read our writing tip “verb agreement with indefinite pronouns.”1. Both of the German shepherds belonging to that family always been good watchdogs.hashave2. Should we go to the early show or late evening show? Either me.suitssuit3. Some of the families in the neighbourhood striving to adopt a zero-waste lifestyle.isare4. After the conference, several of us to stay in town for a few days to do some sightseeing.plansplan5. Nobody expecting the bride and groom to perform a choreographed hip hop routine for their first dance together.waswere6. More of my joy in giving parties from the party planning and preparation than from the party itself!comescome7. Ima has had many jobs, but few been as rewarding as her job as a community service worker.hashave8. Each of the recipes in this cookbook me of a special time with my grandmother.remindsremind9. All of the furnishings chosen by the interior decorator the perfect style for the house’s modern design.waswere10. One of Noah’s short stories being considered for a collection of short stories by up-and-coming Canadian authors.isare  
Source : Jeux du Portail linguistique du Canada
Nombre de consultations : 57 434

What’s up with "you"

An English post discussing the evolution of the pronoun you.Other languages have at least two ways to say “you.” And some have even more. French has “tu” and “vous.” German has “du” and “ihr” and “Sie.” Spanish has “tú” and “usted” and “vosotros” and “ustedes.” But English has only “you.” For one person or several. For a subject or an object. It wasn’t always that way. Old English had three second-person pronouns, with different subject and object forms. And Middle English had two: the singular “thou” (object: “thee”) and the plural “ye” (which was gradually replaced by its object form “you”). So how did “you” end up as the sole survivor? It seems that we owe our lone second-person pronoun to two main factors: French … and snobbery. After the Norman conquest of England in 1066, French exerted a considerable influence on the English language. For one thing, thousands of words came into English from French. But vocabulary isn’t all we borrowed from those refined and courtly Normans; they also introduced us to a new way of using pronouns. They used their plural pronoun “vous” to speak to two or more people; but they also used it to show respect to one person of high status. And they used their singular pronoun “tu” to speak affectionately to a close friend or family member; but they also used it to speak down to someone of lower rank, such as a servant. Evidently, we liked the idea of using pronouns to show social rank. Over the following centuries, we gradually adopted the same practice in English, using “you” like French “vous,” to show respect when speaking to a stranger, to a superior or to a social equal (among the upper classes). At the same time, we began to use “thou” like French “tu,” to show intimacy with a friend or family member, or to talk down to a social inferior. This usage became well established in English by the 13th century and continued into the 16th century. As part of this process, “thou” even came to be used as a verb meaning “to address someone as ‘thou’ ” (often as a sign of contempt). A good example can be found in Shakespeare’s play Twelfth Night, where a character is urged to call a rival “thou” to suggest that the rival’s status is inferior: “Taunt him with the licence of ink: if thou thou’st him some trice, it shall not be amiss.” And at the trial of Sir Walter Raleigh for treason in 1603, the prosecutor made a point of insulting him with these words: “All that Lord Cobham did was by thy instigation, thou viper! For I thou thee, thou traitor!” Over the 16th and 17th centuries, city people gradually stopped using “thou,” largely out of snobbishness and a consequent fear of offending. Because the upper classes called one another “you,” the members of the growing middle class began to do the same to show their rising social status. At the same time, it became dangerous to use “thou,” which was seen by many as insulting. In a 1660 book, one Quaker wrote that members of his faith (who used the familiar pronoun with everyone to show their belief in equality) were often beaten by “proud men, who would say, 'What! You ill-bred clown, do you Thou me?'" By the 1700s, as a result of these social pressures, “thou” had disappeared altogether from Standard English except in poetry or religious texts. Ironically, the result for today’s English is that “you” and “thou” have switched roles. The once lowly “thou” is now seen as formal, elegant and refined because it belongs to the language of poetry and prayer. And “you,” the pronoun of status in Middle English, is now the universal pronoun used to address any person (or even any animal or object). In short, it has become just a commonplace word. Language is always evolving, and there are many English words whose meaning or use has changed over time. Do you have a favourite example to share with us?
Source : Blogue Nos langues (billets de collaborateurs)
Nombre de consultations : 37 905

Pronoun case with comparisons 2

A quiz on selecting the correct pronoun form.A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun. Unlike nouns, pronouns change their form depending on what they are doing in the sentence. As a result, writers are often confused about whether to use a subject pronoun (I, he, she, we, they) or an object pronoun (me, him, her, us, them). They are even more confused when the pronoun follows a comparison. In the comparisons below, choose the correct subject or object pronoun.Tip: Words are usually left out of sentences with comparisons. To choose the correct pronoun, complete the comparison by mentally adding the missing words. For instance, when the words in brackets are added to the following examples, it becomes easier to see what pronoun is needed: Ted is as tall as I [am]. You gave a bigger piece of cake to Sylvie than [you gave to] me.1. There are others worse off than .weus2. You gave them more cookies than !weus3. No one makes a meaner chili than .Ime4. We are as thrilled as by the news.theythem5. The compliment was meant for you more than .theythem6. Katie is as tall as .hehim7. This turn of events pleases Nina as much as .Ime  
Source : Jeux du Portail linguistique du Canada
Nombre de consultations : 34 819

Peaceable pronouns revisited

An English-language quiz on pronoun agreement in English.Pronouns are peaceable creatures—they like to agree with the words they refer to (called their antecedents). English pronouns should agree with their antecedents in gender, number and person. To test your knowledge of pronoun agreement, pick the answer that is best in formal writing for each question below.1. Gabriel and Sophie spent only a few days planning month-long trip to Peru.his and hertheirhis or hers2. My sister and best friend sold all possessions and bought a one‑way plane ticket to Greece to take a job in tourism.theirherhis3. If anyone would like to try out for the debate team, should sign up for try-outs by the end of the week.weyouthey4. Choose the best sentence for formal writing.If every student does his homework, no homework will be assigned for the weekend.If every student does his or her homework, no homework will be assigned for the weekend.If all the students do their homework, no homework will be assigned for the weekend.5. Every knick-knack and memento had place on the shelf.his or hertheirits6. None of the band members brought sheet music to band practice.herhis or hertheir7. Neither the tenants nor the landlady had made intentions clear.theirherone's8. The Johnston family has decided to take vacation without the Tremblay family this year.itstheirthe9. The audience asked questions one by one.itstheirhis or her10. Since the university launched a new recruitment campaign, our enrolment rate has increased.This sentence contains a shift in person.This sentence contains a shift in number.This sentence contains a shift in person and in number.  
Source : Jeux du Portail linguistique du Canada
Nombre de consultations : 33 780

Embracing the singular “they” as a gender-neutral pronoun

An English blog post on the use of the singular “they” as a gender-neutral pronoun.Almost nothing about being transgender has been easy for me. Luckily, I’m English-speaking, which means there’s a very simple way to use the pronouns that work best for me. The singular use of “they” and its other grammatical forms (“them”/“theirs”) is the most comfortable pronoun usage for me. I’m a genderqueer, transgender person whose gender presentation is more masculine-of-centre. What does all of that mean? Respect and inclusion It means I’m a human being just like you, who deserves the same amount of respect as my other colleagues. It also means that I don’t feel comfortable being referred to as “male” or “female”; and while I will accept masculine pronouns, using neutral pronouns when speaking of me is the best way to not exclude me. We have an incredible capacity and ability to continually grow the English language, adapting and evolving as our society does. We have many opportunities to grow ourselves, interpersonally, at work and in our wider social circles, by being self-aware and self-educating and by moving with the times, as it were. Evolution of singular “they” The use of singular “they” has been around for centuries, from William Shakespeare to Jane Austen to Charles Dickens. More recently, singular “they” has become normalized via the protections that have been put in place for genderqueer and gender non-conforming (or non-binary) individuals. This is certainly in part thanks to Canada’s Bill C-16. Having basic human rights protections against discrimination towards transgender persons is a great step forward for Canada. As editor Gael Spivak also points out in her blog post, singular “they” has been around for hundreds of years, and it’s here to stay. I’ve had many people ask me what the point is, why I make things harder for myself, why I can’t just “pick one” (meaning “he” or “she”), or inquire about the importance of pronouns and their proper usage. Personal pronouns are linked to identity Pronouns are important as they teach people how to properly refer to the person they’re speaking about. They show people the best way to respect me. They’re important as a part of my identity and an expression of who I am. I know I’m genderqueer as surely as a cisgender person knows they’re not transgender! I don’t use singular “they” in order to make things harder for others, to be trendy, or to push any kind of agenda. I use it because it makes me feel like myself. It’s the right and most comfortable fit for me. Perhaps you don’t feel as attached to your pronouns, but perhaps you’ve never had to assert them as valid. Maybe you haven’t had to assert your personal pronouns as a part of your identity while others have purposefully misused these words to attack you … while others have decided for you that, on the basis of their perception of who you are, you aren’t who you say you are. Learning to use neutral pronouns One of the problems I’ve encountered in the workplace is how to properly use “they” as a singular pronoun. I don’t demand that everyone in my workplace use singular “they” for me, as I’m also comfortable being referred to in the masculine. However, I do normalize singular “they” when speaking about clients or other colleagues, depending on the context. I do tell people that I use “they” pronouns, I wear a “they/them” pronoun pin with my identification card, and I have produced educational materials on neutral pronouns and how to use them. So, how exactly do you use them? Here are a few examples with some fun facts about myself: Christopher is not in today; they went to Iceland on vacation. They have a cat named Agent S. They are always finding ways to help educate others about LGBTQ2+ issues. Using singular “they” pronouns, or any of the neopronouns, takes practice and patience. Patience for yourself as you retrain your brain, and patience from the person whose pronouns you’re attempting not to botch. “Practice makes perfect” holds true for the singular use of “they” pronouns. I invite you to practise: you can start by thinking of all the instances where you already automatically use “they” in the singular. For example, if you receive a phone call but the caller hangs up, you may be likely to say, “I don’t know, they hung up” when someone asks you who called. What other instances can you think of where you have already begun to normalize the use of “they” as a singular pronoun?
Source : Blogue Nos langues (billets de collaborateurs)
Nombre de consultations : 28 632

Pronoun case

A quiz on selecting the correct pronoun form.Is it I or me? He or him? She or her?A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun. But unlike nouns, pronouns change their form. If the pronoun is a subject or subject complement, it must be in the subject form (I, he, she, we, they). But when the pronoun is the object of a verb or preposition, it must be in the object form (me, him, her, us, them). In the questions below, choose the correct form of the pronoun.Tip: When the pronoun is joined to other subjects or objects, omit the extra words, and then try each pronoun in the sentence. For example: Rick and (I, me) went to a movie. When you take out the extra subject Rick (along with the joining word and), it’s easy to see the right answer: I went to a movie.1. Silvana and skated the entire Rideau Canal.Ime2. The team leader assigned the task to Rhonda and .Ime3. It’s up to parents to make sure our children have happy childhoods.weus4. Claudio went shopping with Amanda and .theythem5. The only ones who participated in the event were Raphaël and .sheher6. Jean, Eric and spent the day skiing at Mont Tremblant.hehim7. It was who ate all the gingersnap cookies.Ime  
Source : Jeux du Portail linguistique du Canada
Nombre de consultations : 23 261

Pronoun case with comparisons 1

A quiz on selecting the correct pronoun form.A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun. Unlike nouns, pronouns change their form depending on what they are doing in the sentence. As a result, writers are often confused about whether to use a subject pronoun (I, he, she, we, they) or an object pronoun (me, him, her, us, them). They are even more confused when the pronoun follows a comparison. In the comparisons below, choose the correct subject or object pronoun.Tip: Words are usually left out of sentences with comparisons. To choose the correct pronoun, complete the comparison by mentally adding the missing words. For instance, when the words in brackets are added to the following examples, it becomes easier to see what pronoun is needed: Ted is as tall as I [am]. You gave a bigger piece of cake to Sylvie than [you gave to] me.1. This will hurt you more than .Ime2. Lino was more gifted in languages than .theythem3. No one can bake an apple pie better than .sheher4. Brian felt neglected because his father spent more time with others than .hehim5. This tonic helped us as much as .theythem6. The people in the study lost as much weight as .weus7. Although she has a tiny frame, she can eat as much as .hehim  
Source : Jeux du Portail linguistique du Canada
Nombre de consultations : 19 826

Who or whom 1

A quiz on the difference between the pronouns who and whom.Do you have problems choosing between the pronouns who and whom? Many people do. Here's a tip: use who as the subject of a verb and whom as the object of a verb or preposition.1. wants gelato?whowhom2. are you going to believe? Me or her?whowhom3. do you think will come to the party tomorrow night?whowhom4. Sasha made many friends in Guadalajara—one of will visit him in Canada next year.whowhom5. Michela is the one passed the National Lifeguard Service.whowhom6. The woman we met in Mallorca was the owner of the villa.whowhom7. With did Aman speak yesterday?whowhom  
Source : Jeux du Portail linguistique du Canada
Nombre de consultations : 13 341

Me or myself

A quiz on when to use me and myself (and other pronoun forms).Me and myself are both pronouns. Me (like us, him, her and them) is the object form of a personal pronoun, used when the pronoun is the object of a verb or a preposition (helped me; with me).Myself (like yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, yourselves and themselves) is a compound personal pronoun, used to refer to a noun or pronoun in the same sentence. Compound personal pronouns can show that an action reflects back on the subject (I hurt myself), or they can show emphasis (I did it myself or I myself did it).See if you know when to use these two types of pronouns by taking this short quiz.1. He walked with Henry and on the way to school.memyself2. Abdul threw into the project with enthusiasm.himhimself3. The pastry chef made a cake for Mitzi and to eat at the party.usourselves4. The bus splashed Maneesha and as it sped past the bus stop.memyself5. The trainer helped them to position correctly on the equipment.themthemselves6. Jane expected a large group, but wondered whether anyone would come.me, II myself7. After hearing them testify in their own defence, we believe that the defendants have proven to be innocent.themthemselves8. Greg and I enjoyed at the park.usourselves  
Source : Jeux du Portail linguistique du Canada
Nombre de consultations : 10 569