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Résultats 1 à 10 de 63 (page 1 de 7)

Types of nouns 1

A quiz on the different types of nouns found in EnglishThere are many different types of nouns: proper, common, concrete, abstract, countable, non-countable, collective, verbal and compound. See if you can identify the types of nouns shown in square brackets in the sentences below.1. The [Rideau Canal] is a Unesco World Heritage Site.common nounproper nounabstract noun2. The Canal connects two [cities]: Ottawa and Kingston.common nounnon-countable nouncompound noun3. The Rideau Canal was built for military and commercial [purposes].concrete nounnon-countable nounabstract noun4. To commemorate the workers who died during the [building] of the Canal, the Rideau Canal Celtic Cross memorial was erected along the canal route in Ottawa.collective nounverbal nouncompound noun5. The monument is also dedicated to the [families] of the workers.collective nounnon-countable nounabstract noun6. During winter, approximately eight kilometres of the Canal becomes a [skateway].proper nounabstract nouncompound noun7. [Malaria] was endemic in Ontario during the construction of the canal.non-countable nouncountable nounproper noun8. The Rideau Waterway was designated a Canadian Heritage River in the [year] 2000.countable nounnon-countable nounconcrete noun9. The [locks] of the Rideau Canal are still operated the way they were in 1832, when the Canal was first built.concrete nounabstract nouncollective noun  
Source : Jeux du Portail linguistique du Canada
Nombre de consultations : 40 848

Countable and uncountable nouns: Let us count the ways

An English-language quiz on countable and uncountable nouns.In English, nouns are "countable" or "uncountable." Countable nouns refer to things and concepts that can be counted, like two hours, five puppies and twenty geraniums. Uncountable nouns refer to things and concepts that cannot be counted, such as luggage, information or courage.In the following sentences, identify whether the nouns in square brackets are countable or uncountable.1. The only pieces of [furniture] in the room were a table and a chair.countableuncountable2. Many advances in medical [technology] were made in the late twentieth century.countableuncountable3. I heard a strange [noise] coming from the attic last night.countableuncountable4. The local animal shelter is offering free [rabies] vaccines today.countableuncountable5. Would you like a [chocolate] with or without filling?countableuncountable6. Harold brought a soft [cheese] with a slightly nutty taste.countableuncountable7. The men's [gymnastics] competition was included in the Olympic Games in the late nineteenth century.countableuncountable  
Source : Jeux du Portail linguistique du Canada
Nombre de consultations : 38 628

insight about, insight as to, insight into, insight regarding

A writing tip on the noun insight and the prepositions to be used with it.
With the noun insight, the usual preposition is into. Other prepositions (including about, as to and regarding) are occasionally encountered. After studying this report for days, I now have some insight into this complex issue. Maxine has no insight regarding (as to) her son’s shortcomings. She thinks he can do no wrong. This experienced diplomat will provide us with fresh insight(s) about the war in the Middle East.
Source : Writing Tips Plus (difficultés et règles de la langue anglaise)
Nombre de consultations : 27 778

Plurals of compounds

An English-language quiz on plurals of compounds.Take this quiz to test your knowledge of plural compounds.1. The could not convince their clients to settle out of court.attorneys-at-lawsattornies-at-lawattorneys-at-law2. "The from this project will be exponential," said the CEO.spinsoffspinoffsspinsoffs3. During her trip to Thailand, Marilyn was grateful for her .layoverslaysoverslaysover4. The new recruits are real .goes-gettergo-gettersgos-getters5. A crowd of had gathered at the scene.lookers-onlooker-onslookers-ons6. As the firefighters were called to the scene, they saw many .flares-upflares-upsflare-ups7. There are several to the Queen of England.aides-de-campsaide-de-campsaides-de-camp  
Source : Jeux du Portail linguistique du Canada
Nombre de consultations : 18 129

Countable and uncountable nouns

An English-language quiz on countable and uncountable nouns.In English, nouns are "countable" or "uncountable." Countable nouns refer to things and concepts that can be counted, like two hours, five puppies and twenty geraniums. Uncountable nouns refer to things and concepts that cannot be counted, such as luggage, information or courage.In the following sentences, identify whether the nouns in square brackets are countable or uncountable.1. Mad cow disease is in the [news] again.countableuncountable2. Recent studies have shown that [people] like to talk about themselves.countableuncountable3. Akiko used two sheets of [paper] to make an origami butterfly.countableuncountable4. Uncle Rodney added too much [cauliflower] to the stir-fry dish.countableuncountable5. The bride's henna tattoo is a beautiful [work] of art.countableuncountable6. Before starting his shift, the teller carefully counted all the [money] in his drawer.countableuncountable7. Bailey won't eat anything but organic [chicken] when she goes out for dinner.countableuncountable8. [Economics] is a popular major at certain universities.countableuncountable9. Jane had a great [time] at the party last night. countableuncountable10. Getting through [customs] can take a long time.countableuncountable  
Source : Jeux du Portail linguistique du Canada
Nombre de consultations : 15 264

subject complement

A writing tip explaining how to recognize a subject complement.
A complement (spelled with an e) is something that completes. And a subject complement is something that completes our idea of the subject of a sentence by giving us more information about it. Usually, the subject complement is a noun, a pronoun or an adjective. Location in the sentence A subject complement is found in the predicate of a sentence (the part of the sentence that contains the verb and makes a statement about the subject). The subject complement follows a linking verb (a verb that expresses a state of being). A verb of being is called a linking verb because it simply links the subject with the subject complement, without expressing any action. In a sentence with a linking verb and a subject complement, the subject is not doing anything; instead, the subject is being something. Our most common linking verb is the verb be and its forms am, is, are, was, were, been and being. In addition, the verbs seem, appear, become, grow, look, feel, sound, smell and taste can all act as linking verbs. Examples Here are some examples of sentences with linking verbs and subject complements: Jan is an excellent doctor. Here, the subject complement is the noun doctor (along with its modifiers an excellent), which tells us something about the subject Jan; the verb is simply links them without expressing any action. The winners of the bubble-tea-drinking contest are you and Wang. In the above example, the pronoun you and the noun Wang are the subject complements identifying the subject winners; the verb are simply links them without expressing any action. Arabella’s recipe for turnip cordial tasted unusual. Here, the subject complement unusual is an adjective describing the subject recipe; the verb tasted simply links them without expressing any action. The players seem excited about the upcoming game. In this last example, the subject complement excited is an adjective describing the subject players; the verb seem simply links them without expressing any action.
Source : Writing Tips Plus (difficultés et règles de la langue anglaise)
Nombre de consultations : 12 653

forward, forwards

A writing tip on the terms forward and forwards.
Forward is an adverb, an adjective, a verb and a noun. Please step forward when your name is called. [adverb] Without reverse gear, we are limited to a forward motion. [adjective] I will forward that email immediately. [verb] In hockey, soccer and football a forward plays on the front line. [noun] Forwards is a variant form of the adverb and is becoming rare. She rocked gently backwards and forwards (or backward and forward).
Source : Writing Tips Plus (difficultés et règles de la langue anglaise)
Nombre de consultations : 10 966

Inuk, Inuit (Linguistic recommendation from the Translation Bureau)

An English linguistic recommendation from the Translation Bureau on how to use the terms Inuk and Inuit in the federal public service
On this page A note about the recommendation “Inuk” and “Inuit” used as nouns “Inuk” and “Inuit” used as adjectives Additional information A note about the recommendation The Translation Bureau recommends using the terms Inuk and Inuit both as nouns and as adjectives in English. Inuit can be used adjectivally in all contexts. However, Inuk can be used only to modify one person, in keeping with its sense in Inuktitut, the language from which it is borrowed. “Inuk” and “Inuit” used as nouns A concern for reconciliation and inclusivity requires that, when referring to Indigenous persons, we use the terms preferred by the community. Thus, we refer to the traditional inhabitants of Canada’s northern regions and Arctic coastline by the terms Inuk and Inuit. Inuk is the singular noun, used to refer to one person, regardless of gender. It is always capitalized and can be preceded by a definite or indefinite article: He is the first Inuk to have been called to the Nunavut Bar. She is an Inuk from Kuujjuaq in northeastern Quebec. Inuit is the plural noun. It is always capitalized. Because the word Inuit is already plural in form in Inuktitut, it is used in English without the English plural ending “s”: Correct: Inuit are working to preserve their language. Incorrect: Inuits are working to preserve their language. Since Inuit means "the people" in Inuktitut, do not use the definite article “the” or the word “people” in combination with Inuit: Correct: Inuit use traditional hunting methods. Incorrect: The Inuit use traditional hunting methods. Incorrect: The Inuit people use traditional hunting methods. Note: In addition to singular and plural forms, Inuktitut has a dual form used to refer to two people: Inuuk. Although Inuuk is used less frequently in English, it is still accepted. “Inuk” and “Inuit” used as adjectives Either Inuk or Inuit can be used as an adjective to describe a person. These terms are always capitalized: The Inuk Elder was honoured for contributions to the community. This award-winning Inuit designer combines fashion and tradition. But the adjective Inuk can be used only to describe one person, never two or more. With plural nouns referring to human beings, the adjective that’s used is Inuit: The non-profit organization is the voice of Inuit women in Canada. The website showcases original art created by Inuit artists. In addition, Inuk is never used to modify anything non-human. The adjective used to describe one or more places, things, qualities or ideas is Inuit: This Inuit hamlet is a cultural hub in summer. Traditional Inuit garments were made from animal skins and fur. Inuit hospitality is legendary. In the Inuit concept of health, the mind, body, spirit and environment are interconnected. Additional information Update on the words “Inuk” and “Inuit” (blog post) Inuit, inuk (Recommandation linguistique du Bureau de la traduction) (in French only)
Source : Writing Tips Plus (difficultés et règles de la langue anglaise)
Nombre de consultations : 10 461

Countable and uncountable nouns: To count or not to count

An English-language quiz on countable and uncountable nouns.In English, nouns are "countable" or "uncountable." Countable nouns refer to things and concepts that can be counted, like two hours, five puppies and twenty geraniums. Uncountable nouns refer to things and concepts that cannot be counted, such as luggage, information or courage.In the following sentences, identify whether the nouns in square brackets are countable or uncountable.1. Uncle Bert ordered [spaghetti] and meatballs for dinner.countableuncountable2. Waiter! There’s a [hair] in my soup!countableuncountable3. We cancelled our holidays because the baby came down with the [measles].countableuncountable4. Vivian failed to see the [humour] of the situation.countableuncountable5. Angelo washed down his doughnut with a large [coffee].countableuncountable6. Valerie—a chronic insomniac—always feels better whenever she gets enough [sleep].countableuncountable7. Do you know how to play [billiards]?countableuncountable  
Source : Jeux du Portail linguistique du Canada
Nombre de consultations : 8 120

The parts of speech: Introduction

An article listing the various parts of speech with links to other articles.
Traditional grammar classifies words based on eight parts of speech: the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction and the interjection. Each part of speech explains not what the word is, but how the word is used. In fact, the same word can be a noun in one sentence and a verb or adjective in another. The next examples show how the part of speech of a word can change from one sentence to the next. Following these examples is a series of sections on the individual parts of speech and an exercise. Example Explanation Books are made of ink, paper and glue. In this sentence, books is a noun, the subject of the sentence. Joe waits patiently while Bridget books the tickets. Here books is a verb and its subject is Bridget. We walk down the street. In this sentence, walk is a verb and its subject is the pronoun we. The letter carrier stood on the walk. In this example, walk is a noun that is part of a prepositional phrase describing where the letter carrier stood. The town council decided to build a new jail. Here jail is a noun, which is the object of the infinitive phrase to build. The police officer told us that if we did not leave immediately he would jail us. Here jail is part of the compound verb would jail. The parents heard high-pitched cries in the middle of the night. In this sentence, cries is a noun acting as the direct object of the verb heard. Their colicky baby cries all night long and all day long. Here cries is a verb that describes the actions of the subject of the sentence, i.e. the baby. The next sections explain each of the parts of speech in detail. When you have finished looking at them, you might want to test yourself by trying the exercise. The details Verb - Next Page Noun Pronoun Adjective Adverb Preposition Conjunction Interjection Review exercise: Parts of speech
Source : HyperGrammar 2 (notions de base de la grammaire anglaise)
Nombre de consultations : 7 264