Why I love learning French

On this page

Posted: 
June 11, 2018
Written by: Jennifer S.

I recently started taking French classes again after 30 years, and I'm really enjoying it. According to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (a guideline developed by the Council of Europe to assess language levels), I'm at the upper intermediate level. And I'm amazed at how much I can still remember from my younger years!

I loved learning French back then; and I still do now, for 3 reasons: it's fun, it's rewarding, and it fits my learning style.

How it's fun

First of all, it's fun because I feel like a 10-year-old kid again, learning for the very first time. But this time around, everyone in my class is at the same level. It's reassuring to know that we're all experiencing some fear and feeling silly at times.

Another thing that's fun is that we all come from different backgrounds and have different life experiences. It's fascinating to watch how everyone develops the grammar, reading, writing, listening and conversation skills differently.

And our instructor really knows how to make the class enjoyable. Not only is she enthusiastic and patient with us, but she also keeps the class at a good pace so that everyone is engaged.

How it's rewarding

In addition to being fun, the class has proven to be a very rewarding experience for me. For one thing, in our technology-driven world, it's refreshing for me to learn face to face. Technology is a helpful tool, but it's more satisfying to interact with a native speaker who can give me detailed feedback and encourage me.

But what really matters is our own personal desire and motivation. In my case, learning French has given my life new meaning during a time of transition. I'm learning French because I want to, not because it's required. And that makes all the difference!

How it fits my learning style

Finally, the approach we're using fits my learning style for different reasons. One is the pace. Learning a language can't be rushed. I like the fact that there's a well-defined learning pathway that allows me to progress in stages, at a comfortable rate.

In addition, the learning method used is very systematic, and I'm good at recognizing patterns. For example, when a new word, expression or phrase is introduced, I learn how to use it grammatically in a sentence. Next, I learn how it sounds phonetically in order to say it properly. This process continues until everything becomes easy to recognize and second nature. The important thing is to make sure that every day I have some exposure to the language.

Also, I learn best when more than one part of my brain is involved in the learning process. In our class, we use both visuals and audio to learn the French language, so different parts of my brain are working together to process all the information. It's exciting when it all comes together and starts to click!

For all of the above reasons, coming back to the study of French as an adult has turned out to be a great decision. I can say with enthusiasm, "Apprendre le français, c'est une bonne idée!"

How about you? Have you enjoyed improving your skills in a second (or third) language? Let me know in a comment!

Disclaimer

The opinions expressed in posts and comments published on the Our Languages blog are solely those of the authors and commenters and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Language Portal of Canada.

categories-bullets

About the author

Jennifer S.

Jennifer has travelled, studied, and worked in the hospitality industry and health care. She hopes to continue pursuing her lifelong passion for learning French and become fluent.

Jennifer encourages everyone to use the excellent resources available on the Language Portal of Canada.

Add a comment

Join in the conversation and share your comments!

Please consult the Government of Canada’s Commenting Policy before adding your comment. The Language Portal of Canada reviews comments before they’re posted. We reserve the right to edit, refuse or remove any question or comment that violates the Government of Canada’s Commenting Policy.

By submitting a comment, you permanently waive your moral rights, which means that you give the Government of Canada permission to use, reproduce, edit and share your comment royalty-free, in whole or in part, in any manner it chooses. You also confirm that nothing in your comment infringes third party rights (for example, the use of a text from a third party without his or her permission).

Comments

There are currently no comments.

Date modified: