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Language Navigator simultaneously searches all of the writing tools, quizzes and blog posts on the Language Portal of Canada. It gives you access to everything you need to write well in English and French: articles on language difficulties, linguistic recommendations, conjugation tables, translation suggestions and much more.

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Results 1 to 10 of 110 (page 1 of 11)

Clauses and phrases 1

An English-language quiz on identifying clauses and phrases.Clauses and phrases are similar, yet different. As you may recall, a clause is a group of related words that has a subject and a predicate. A phrase is also a group of related words, but is missing a subject or a predicate or both.Test your knowledge by picking out which of these examples are clauses and which are phrases.1. in a heated mannerclausephrase2. they were arguing in a heated mannerclausephrase3. the presentation of the new productclausephrase4. the team leader is giving the same presentation againclausephrase5. the report consultedclausephrase6. the managers consulted the annual reportclausephrase7. will leave soonclausephrase8. leave soonclausephrase  Note: Adapted from HyperGrammar (copyright 1994, 1995 and 1996) produced by the Faculty of Arts at the University of Ottawa.
Source: Quizzes on the Language Portal of Canada
Number of views: 121,442

Types of phrases 1

An English-language quiz on identifying types of phrases.A phrase is a group of words that forms a unit simpler than a sentence. Unlike a sentence, a phrase does not contain a subject and a verb.Many different types of phrases can be used to build sentences. See if you can name the type of phrase in square brackets in each sentence below.1. We all sighed in relief, [James having found his passport].noun phraseverb phraseprepositional phraseinfinitive phraseparticiple phrasegerund phraseabsolute phrase2. The day ended with [feasting on Spanish tapas and local wine].noun phraseverb phraseprepositional phraseinfinitive phraseparticiple phrasegerund phraseabsolute phrase3. [To celebrate their arrival at the villa], they all enjoyed a glass of Mallorcan wine on the terrace overlooking the sea.noun phraseverb phraseprepositional phraseinfinitive phraseparticiple phrasegerund phraseabsolute phrase4. As a souvenir, Mary bought herself [a beautiful, oval-shaped, soft pink pearl].noun phraseverb phraseprepositional phraseinfinitive phraseparticiple phrasegerund phraseabsolute phrase5. [Fascinated by the stalactites and stalagmites in the cave], the tourists took many pictures.noun phraseverb phraseprepositional phraseinfinitive phraseparticiple phrasegerund phraseabsolute phrase6. Once [at the beach], they all settled down on lounge chairs.noun phraseverb phraseprepositional phraseinfinitive phraseparticiple phrasegerund phraseabsolute phrase7. Patricia [would have gone] for a walk to explore the surroundings had others been interested.noun phraseverb phraseprepositional phraseinfinitive phraseparticiple phrasegerund phraseabsolute phrase  
Source: Quizzes on the Language Portal of Canada
Number of views: 98,008

Pesky prepositions: Choose correctly!

A quiz on prepositional usage.Do you say immune from or immune to death? Are you free of headaches or free from headaches? For those of you who like a challenge, here is a short quiz on prepositional usage.1. New mothers and fathers are often anxious their parenting skills.aboutatofwith2. Tristan was anxious Iseult's delay.aboutatofwith3. No one is immune death.againstfromto4. Julie thought she was immune chicken pox, but there she lies, itching and uncomfortable.againstfromto5. With his scientific background, Canadian Chris Hadfield is suited his job as an astronaut.atforinby6. These hybrid roses are suited colder climates.atbyinto7. The best thing about vacations is being free the daily grind.fromof8. Saviz has been free headaches for several weeks.fromof  
Source: Quizzes on the Language Portal of Canada
Number of views: 51,422

Pesky prepositions: Choose carefully!

A quiz on prepositional usage.Though native English speakers generally use prepositions correctly without giving them a second thought, most students of the language struggle to master these pesky words. So regardless of your level of proficiency in this area, you will enjoy this short quiz—a refresher if you will—on prepositional usage.1. The United Nations designated 2010 the International Year of Biodiversity.asforto2. Hockey players are no longer associated the same team for many years.attowith3. I differed Ashley about our bike club's budget.intowith4. Denzil's answers to the math questions differed Samantha's.fromintowith5. The east and west coasts of Canada differ greatly climate.fromintowith6. The failed entrepreneur was now liable her company's $500,000 debt.forofto7. Travellers who smuggle drugs are liable arrest and imprisonment.forofto8. Cooperation and trust open the channels of sympathy partners.betweenfortotoward(s)9. Economically, Canada developed in parallel the United States.betweenfortowith  
Source: Quizzes on the Language Portal of Canada
Number of views: 29,088

signed at, signed in

A writing tip explaining how to use the prepositions at and in with the participle signed.
Both signed at and signed in are correct. However, in legal documents such as contracts, conventions and agreements, the traditional expression signed at is more common. The Treaty of Paris was signed in Paris on February 10, 1763. International Convention Against the Taking of Hostages. Signed at New York on 18 December 1979. The prepositions in and at both indicate place or location. However, in emphasizes the idea of being inside or within boundaries, while at expresses exact position, such as a point on a map.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 24,470

benefit by, benefit from

A writing tip on the difference between benefit by and benefit from.
The expression benefit from means to receive an advantage because of the action or existence of something. Aspiring athletes benefit greatly not only from participating in regional competitive events, but also from watching world-class athletes in the Olympics. The people of Ontario and Quebec benefit economically from the abundance of hydroelectricity. Benefit by has a more limited use and refers strictly to an advantage received as the result of a given action. Newfoundlanders still debate whether they benefited by joining Confederation in 1949. Note: For the simple past and the present participle of the verb benefit, the recommended spelling is benefited and benefiting.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 18,648

A couple of questions

An English-language quiz on using the phrase a couple of.Knowing when to use the preposition of after the phrase a couple can be downright confusing. For each question below, choose the correct answer.1. The Farleys had relatives over for brunch last Sunday.a couplea couple of2. After having too many servings of turkey, Brent fell asleep on the couch.a couplea couple of3. Don’t forget to pack pairs of long pants for the trip.a couplea couple of4. Our neighbours won million dollars in last week’s super lottery.a couplea couple of5. We planted red maples along the northwest side of the house last fall.a couplea couple of6. Bronwyn is taking more classes than she did last semester.a couplea couple of7. Sylvano scored goals more than Connor did.a couplea couple of  
Source: Quizzes on the Language Portal of Canada
Number of views: 15,511

Clauses and phrases 2

A quiz on clauses and phrases in English.Clauses and phrases are similar, yet different. As you may recall, a clause is a group of related words that has a subject and a predicate. A phrase is also a group of related words, but it lacks a subject or a predicate or both.Test your knowledge by picking out which of these examples are clauses and which are phrases.1. by the shore of the lake stood a campclausephrase2. several people walking beside the lakeclausephrase3. wearing coats with hoods turned up against the cold breezeclausephrase4. they enjoyed seeing the wildlifeclausephrase5. the Canada geese flying overhead with loud criesclausephrase6. after this morning's sleetclausephrase7. the rocks on the shore were slippery underfootclausephrase8. their surface covered in a thin layer of iceclausephrase  
Source: Quizzes on the Language Portal of Canada
Number of views: 13,759

responsibility of, responsibility for

An article on the prepositions to be used after the noun responsibility.
The noun responsibility can be followed by the prepositions for and of. The oil company was forced to assume responsibility for the spill. Note that when of is used after the noun responsibility, the definite article must be used before the noun. The governor general has the responsibility of appointing the members of the King’s Privy Council for Canada.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 12,402

reconcile to, reconcile with

An article on the prepositions to be used with the verb reconcile.
The verb reconcile can be followed by the preposition to or with. The expression reconcile to means to cause (a person) to accept something difficult or disagreeable. His courage and faith reconciled him to possible death on the battlefield. The lackadaisical student was reconciled to failure. The expression reconcile with means to restore harmonious or friendly relations with another person. Sarah reconciled with her husband after a one-year separation.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 11,476