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faulty comparisons

When making a comparison, avoid making illogical or unclear statements

Illogical comparisons

In illogical comparisons, the writer uses a faulty structure, which often leaves out a key element or idea.

  • Illogical: The blender at this store is cheaper than the other store.
    [The blender costs less than a store?]
  • Logical: The blender at this store is cheaper than the one at the other store.
  • Illogical: I think green cleaning products perform as well, or better, than traditional ones.
    [As well than?]
  • Logical: I think green cleaning products perform as well as, or better than, traditional ones.
  • Illogical: Unlike Consuela, Devon’s cooking is bland.
    [Consuela is not like Devon’s cooking? Should she be?]
  • Logical: Unlike Consuela’s cooking, Devon’s is bland.

OR

  • Unlike Consuela, Devon cooks bland foods.
  • Illogical: Pepe eats more than anyone I know.
    [I know Pepe, so he can’t eat more than anyone I know!]
  • Logical: Pepe eats more than anyone else I know.

Unclear comparisons

In unclear comparisons, the reader can’t tell what or who is being compared.

  • Unclear: Greta paid a lower price for the concert tickets.
    [Lower than somebody else paid? Lower than she paid for something else?]
  • Clear: Greta paid a lower price for the concert tickets than Abdul did.

OR

  • Greta paid a lower price for the concert tickets than for the tickets to the play.
  • Unclear: Fred sees Joanne more often than Naomi.
    [Does Fred see Naomi? Or does Naomi see Joanne?]
  • Clear: Fred sees Joanne more often than he sees Naomi.

OR

  • Fred sees Joanne more often than Naomi does.

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