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Results 1 to 10 of 63 (page 1 of 7)

Weed your words: Clear the clutter

A quiz on weeding out redundancies.We are often told to write the way we speak. But sometimes when we speak, we use more words than we need. While we can get away with redundant and long-winded expressions in speech, we should be careful to avoid this fault in writing. See if you can weed out the unnecessary words in the sentences below.1. No one single person knew the answer.singlesingle and personone2. Children under the age of five must receive this vaccination.the age ofthe and ofunder the age3. By working together, we can build a better community.canby workingno words are redundant4. Take this medication in combination with food to avoid an upset stomach.in combinationstomachno words are redundant5. I worked on the project together with your mother for years before we achieved notable success.togethernotableno words are redundant6. We are in close contact with people in this region, and all without exception have congratulated us on what we have done.closewithout exceptionno words are redundant7. The committee closely scrutinized the report with a fine tooth comb.closelywith a fine tooth combclosely and with a fine tooth comb  
Source: Quizzes on the Language Portal of Canada
Number of views: 10,336

Weed your words: Remove redundancies

A quiz on weeding out redundancies.We are often told to write the way we speak. But sometimes when we speak, we use more words than we need. While we can get away with redundant and long-winded expressions in speech, we should be careful to avoid this fault in writing. See if you can weed out the unnecessary words in the sentences below.1. Marisol had to write her essay all over again after her hard drive crashed.overall overno words are redundant2. The mayor and city councillors reached a general consensus of opinion on waste disposal.generalgeneral, of opinionof opinion3. Sidney is the fastest skater of the three Canadian skaters.skaterCanadian skatersno words are redundant4. Use a soft measuring tape to measure around your waist.softsoft, aroundaround5. Rosalie always wakes up at 2 a.m. in the morning.in the morninga.m. in the morningno words are redundant6. There are nine students who signed up for the advanced workshop.whothere arethere are, who7. Manny was both extremely tired and very hungry.bothboth, veryextremely, very  
Source: Quizzes on the Language Portal of Canada
Number of views: 5,704

owing to the fact that

A writing tip on avoiding the wordy expression owing to the fact that.
Choose because or since instead of the wordy expression owing to the fact that. I missed the bus because (not owing to the fact that) I got up late. Since (not Owing to the fact that) her parents were very wealthy, Deirdre had far too many toys.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 4,430

period of time, time period

A writing tip on how to use the expressions period of time and time period.
Period of time and time period are idiomatic expressions. The auditor examined the company’s receipts and expenditures over a lengthy period of time. This introductory course examines European history by time period. However, where possible, write concisely by replacing these phrases with period or time. The geologist studied the period between the last two ice ages. The change of seasons divides the year into four periods (not time periods). The Depression was a very difficult time (or period) for many people.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 3,010

about, approximately, approximately about, around, roughly, roughly about

A writing tip on the synonyms about, around and approximately and on how to avoid the redundant expressions approximately about and roughly about.
About and around often replace the more formal approximately. If there is a difference, it is that approximately suggests a more careful calculation. Avoid redundant wording such as roughly about or approximately about; instead use about, approximately, around or roughly. We waited about 30 minutes for the bus. Teresa won approximately $500 last week with Lotto 6/49. Redundant wording: Alessandro’s father is roughly about 40 years old. Standard usage: Alessandro’s father is roughly (or around or about) 40 years old.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 2,846

and so as a result

A writing tip on avoiding the redundant expression and so as a result.
Redundancies are words that repeat information unnecessarily. Since the conjunction so indicates result, the expression and so as a result is redundant. Use as a result or so by itself, or use the conjunctive adverb therefore. Redundant: Lise and Mark stopped for dinner, and so as a result they got home late. Recommended: Lise and Mark stopped for dinner; as a result, they got home late. Redundant: The air conditioning was on, and so as a result we were quite comfortable. Recommended: The air conditioning was on, so we were quite comfortable. Redundant: The car wouldn’t start, and so as a result Robert had to take the bus. Recommended: The car wouldn’t start; therefore, Robert had to take the bus.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 2,299

consensus, consensus of opinion, general consensus

A writing tip on the redundant expressions consensus of opinion and general consensus.
Note that the second syllable in the word consensus begins with an s and not a c. Redundant expressions with consensus Because a consensus is a shared opinion, it is redundant to write a consensus of opinion. Management and staff struggled for hours to reach a consensus (not a consensus of opinion). Also, because consensus refers to general agreement among members of a group, using general in front of consensus is like saying general general agreement. Therefore, the modifier general in the familiar expression general consensus is redundant. There was a consensus (not general consensus) among seismologists that the earthquake measured 5.0 on the Richter scale.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 2,170

knot, knots per hour

A writing tip on avoiding the redundant expression knots per hour.
Because a knot is a unit of speed equivalent to one nautical mile (1.85 km) per hour, it is redundant to say or write knots per hour. The cruising speed of a Boeing 747 is about 490 knots (not knots per hour). Winds of up to 75 knots (not knots per hour) are forecast on Lake Michigan. While it has been traditional to measure the speed of ships, aircraft and wind in knots, the metric (SI) measurement of kilometres per hour is preferred in Canada. Even with her sails furled, the Bluenose II can travel at 14.8 km/h (or 8 knots), thanks to her powerful engines. For the sake of clarity, when knot is used as a modifier, a hyphen is inserted between the numeral and knot (e.g., a 75-knot wind). A violent 70-knot gust shredded jibs and mainsails in the Sydney-to-Hobart yacht race.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 1,885

missing gap, gap

A writing tip on avoiding the redundant expression missing gap.
Redundancies are words that unnecessarily repeat information. Because gap indicates the absence of something, the modifier missing in the familiar phrase missing gap is redundant. Site-specific research must be carried out to fill the gaps (not missing gaps).
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 1,839

overused cliché, cliché

A writing tip on avoiding the redundant expression overused cliché.
Redundancies are words that unnecessarily repeat information. Because a cliché is an overused expression, the modifier overused in the familiar expression overused cliché is redundant. He concluded with a cliché (not an overused cliché): Those who forget the past are condemned to repeat it.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 1,758