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Results 1 to 10 of 171 (page 1 of 18)

insight about, insight as to, insight into, insight regarding

A writing tip on the noun insight and the prepositions to be used with it.
With the noun insight, the usual preposition is into. Other prepositions (including about, as to and regarding) are occasionally encountered. After studying this report for days, I now have some insight into this complex issue. Maxine has no insight regarding (as to) her son’s shortcomings. She thinks he can do no wrong. This experienced diplomat will provide us with fresh insight(s) about the war in the Middle East.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 26,890

associate to, associate with

A writing tip on how to use the phrasal verb associate with.
As an intransitive verb (i.e. one that does not take an object), associate with means to be involved with a group as a result of shared interests or goals. The saying “birds of a feather flock together” means that like-minded people associate with one another. As a transitive verb (i.e. one that takes an object), associate with means to establish a link between one thing and another. I associate autumn with the smell of wood smoke and a rich panoply of colours. It is no longer common for a hockey player to be associated with the same team for many years. Associate to is non-standard English.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 18,583

benefits to, benefits of, for the benefit of

An article on the preposition to be used with the plural noun benefits.
When speaking of the person or thing receiving benefits, use the preposition to after the plural noun benefits: If such a drug were developed, the benefits to humanity would be immense. [i.e., humanity would receive benefits] When speaking of the person or thing providing benefits, use the preposition of after the plural noun benefits: The benefits of electricity have been invaluable in the areas of health, safety and communications. [i.e., electricity has provided benefits] For the benefit of However, note that when the singular noun benefit is used with the preposition of in the expression for the benefit of, the reference is to the benefit received (not the benefit provided): This invention must be used for the benefit of humanity. [i.e., humanity must receive the benefit, not provide it]
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 18,026

foot (on, by)

A writing tip on using the phrases by foot and on foot.
The traditional prepositional phrase is on foot. Céline’s bicycle broke down, and she had to go to work on foot. The increasingly common by foot is also accepted but is used much less commonly. It is useful for parallelism when several methods of transportation are listed with the preposition by. Tourists visiting China travel by train, by airplane, by car and by foot.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 16,487

leap, leaped, leapt

A writing tip on the difference between the verb forms leap, leaped and leapt.
The past tense of leap is leaped (pronounced leepd) or leapt (pronounced lept). The verb is often followed by prepositions such as at, down, from, into, on, onto, out of, over, toward, up, and upon. Holger leapt at the chance to show off his wit. The lion leaped from his hiding place upon his prey. The cat leapt onto the windowsill to stare at the chickadees perched on the feeder. The startled frog leaped out of the water, as the children leaped into the pond. The toddler leapt up and down, delighted at the sight of her new puppy.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 16,020

integrate, integrate into, integrate with

A writing tip on the meaning and use of the verb integrate and the phrasal verbs integrate into and integrate with.
When the verb integrate is used without a preposition, the intended meaning is generally to add new members, often of a racial or ethnic minority group, to an institution or society. In the 1960s, the American civil rights movement endeavoured to integrate all schools in the United States. While integrate with and into are interchangeable, integrate with normally suggests that two groups are brought together. Ottawa’s proposed light rail system must be fully integrated with the existing Transitway. Integrate into indicates that a unit is becoming part of a larger entity. Our school policy is to integrate the ESL students into regular classes as quickly as possible.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 15,499

manoeuvre, maneuver

The writing tip on the spelling of the word manœuvre and the preposition often used with it.
The spelling manoeuvre is preferred in Canada and Britain, while maneuver prevails in the United States. Note that the last e is dropped in these combined forms—manoeuvring, manoeuvrable and manoeuvrability. The preposition around is often employed with the verb manoeuvre. The archeologists had to manoeuvre carefully to avoid damaging the architectural relics. The crowd cheered as the pilot manoeuvred the first ship into the harbour. Charlene manoeuvres around the defence to score the winning goal. With careful manoeuvring, Stan was soon in line for a promotion. The new tires improved manoeuvrability on the snowy road. To practise manoeuvring the puck, Souleymane plays hockey at the outdoor rink in his neighbourhood.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 13,881

responsibility of, responsibility for

An article on the prepositions to be used after the noun responsibility.
The noun responsibility can be followed by the prepositions for and of. The oil company was forced to assume responsibility for the spill. Note that when of is used after the noun responsibility, the definite article must be used before the noun. The governor general has the responsibility of appointing the members of the King’s Privy Council for Canada.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 12,042

reconcile to, reconcile with

An article on the prepositions to be used with the verb reconcile.
The verb reconcile can be followed by the preposition to or with. The expression reconcile to means to cause (a person) to accept something difficult or disagreeable. His courage and faith reconciled him to possible death on the battlefield. The lackadaisical student was reconciled to failure. The expression reconcile with means to restore harmonious or friendly relations with another person. Sarah reconciled with her husband after a one-year separation.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 11,044

originate at, originate from, originate in, originate with

A writing tip on the prepositions to be used with the verb originate.
The verb originate is commonly followed by the prepositions in and with. Originate at is seen mainly in mathematical or geographical descriptions and originate from in broadcasting. That belief originated in medieval Europe and has not been challenged to this day. The game of lacrosse originated with the First Nations in southern Ontario. How do you determine the angle between two lines originating at the same point? Today’s broadcast originates from (or in) the CBC studios in the Château Laurier.
Source: Writing Tips Plus (English language problems and rules)
Number of views: 9,825