Ten good reasons to learn French

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Posted: 
April 23, 2019
Written by: Mélanie Roy

You don’t speak French? It’s an official language in 29 countries, so being able to speak it can offer you significant advantages. Here are 10 reasons you should learn French now!

1. To study

If you’ve ever dreamt of doing your post-secondary studies abroad, having a good command of the French language could make that dream a reality. You’ll have a much easier time reading briefs, theses, scholarly articles or literature available in French only.

2. To get ahead in the job market

It’s no secret that the job market is competitive. When given the choice between a unilingual or bilingual candidate with the same skills, employers are sure to opt for the candidate who can speak two languages instead of one. Being perfectly bilingual will also give you access to more job postings, and as a result, you might even find a better job.

3. To travel

One of the biggest worries when travelling abroad is not being able to communicate with or be understood by the locals. However, being able to speak French will allow you to travel with greater confidence. Even in countries where French is not the official language (for example, those in Europe), there’s a good chance that you’ll end up finding someone who speaks the language of Victor Hugo well enough to understand you and provide the information you need.

4. To have access to more information

It’s said that the Internet puts information and the world at your fingertips. Since the inception of the Web, a vast amount of useful and interesting information has been published online in various formats: websites, blogs, tutorials, interactive games, videos, etc. There is a wealth of web content available in French. Mastering French will allow you to take full advantage of the resources the Internet has to offer!

5. To watch French movies and TV shows without subtitles

Let’s face it, it’s so much nicer to be able to focus on the acting and sets than on the subtitles at the bottom of the screen!

6. To read

There’s a whole world of French literature out there. If you speak French, you’ll be able to enjoy the original versions of classics like Jules Verne’s Journey to the Center of the Earth and Anne Hébert’s Kamouraska!

7. To meet people

With nearly 285 million speakers, French is the fifth most spoken language in the world. So chances are that you’ll one day cross paths with someone who speaks French. You wouldn’t want to miss out on an opportunity to meet new people, would you?

8. To stimulate your brain

Several scientific studies have shown that being bilingual is good for your brain. Bilingual children have better cognitive abilities (selective attention, concentration, planning and problem solving). In older people, being bilingual can have a neuroprotective effect, delaying the onset of illnesses such as dementia and Alzheimer’s.

9. To open yourself up to the world

Learning a new language allows you to discover not only another culture but also another way of thinking and seeing the world. Since globalization is making business abroad a must, it’s a good idea to try to understand others, whether they live in a neighbouring country or overseas.

10. To have fun

And isn’t the best reason of all to have fun? Take on a new challenge, put in the effort, and learn to speak French! French is a rich and complex language that will stimulate you in your learning and encourage you to learn more.

I hope I’ve convinced you that learning to speak French will enhance your daily life. There are many reasons to learn this language, but the important thing to remember is that the efforts you make in the short and medium term will be rewarded a hundredfold in the long term. Learning French will make your life easier in many ways! So what are you waiting for?

Adapted by: Denise Ramsankar, Language Portal of Canada

Disclaimer

The opinions expressed in posts and comments published on the Our Languages blog are solely those of the authors and commenters and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Language Portal of Canada.

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About the author

Mélanie Roy

With a bachelor’s in translation and a master’s in literary studies under her belt, Mélanie works as a translator for Public Services and Procurement Canada’s Translation Bureau. A seasoned traveller, marathon runner and volleyball enthusiast with a passion for the French language, reading and writing, Mélanie is always looking for new adventures and new challenges. She is delighted to share her language adventures with readers of the Our Languages blog.

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