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Countable and Uncountable Nouns

You have 1 out of 7 answers correct.

  1. Mad cow disease is in the news again.

    Your answer a) countable is incorrect.
    The correct answer is b) uncountable.

    • Incorrect a) countable
    • Correct b) uncountable

    News is a singular and uncountable noun. You can't say a news or two newses. However, you can say a piece of news, some news or two news items. (In the last example, news functions as an adjective.)

  2. Recent studies have shown that people like to talk about themselves.

    Your answer b) uncountable is incorrect.
    The correct answer is a) countable.

    • Correct a) countable
    • Incorrect b) uncountable

    People is the plural of person and it is countable—we can count people: Fifty people signed up for the training session.

  3. Akiko used two sheets of paper to make an origami butterfly.

    Your answer a) countable is incorrect.
    The correct answer is b) uncountable.

    • Incorrect a) countable
    • Correct b) uncountable

    In this sentence, paper (the substance) is an uncountable noun. However, paper can also be countable: Louis got an F on his three history papers (assignments/essays) because he handed them all in late. The noun paper has a different meaning in this second example.

  4. Uncle Rodney added too much cauliflower to the stir-fry dish.

    Your answer a) countable is incorrect.
    The correct answer is b) uncountable.

    • Incorrect a) countable
    • Correct b) uncountable

    Cauliflower is an uncountable noun. You buy two heads of cauliflower—not two cauliflowers—at the market.

  5. The bride's henna tattoo is a beautiful work of art.

    Your answer a) countable is correct.

    • Correct a) countable
    • Incorrect b) uncountable

    In this sentence, work is a countable noun; a work of art is an artistic creation. However, when work refers to the idea of doing a job, it is an uncountable noun: What kind of work do you do for a living?

  6. Before starting his shift, the teller carefully counted all the money in his drawer.

    Your answer a) countable is incorrect.
    The correct answer is b) uncountable.

    • Incorrect a) countable
    • Correct b) uncountable

    You count money in dollars, euros, pesos, etc., all of which are countable nouns—but money itself, in this sense, is an uncountable noun. However, in financial or legal texts, the plural moneys (or monies) is used to mean "sums of money" and is countable: monies set aside in the budget for renovations.

  7. Bailey won't eat anything but organic chicken when she goes out for dinner.

    Your answer a) countable is incorrect.
    The correct answer is b) uncountable.

    • Incorrect a) countable
    • Correct b) uncountable

    In this sentence, chicken is an uncountable noun—here it refers to the meat: we eat chicken. However, chicken is also a countable noun when it refers to the actual birds: The local farmer raises free-range chickens. Many food items, such as fruit, cheese, meat and wine, are either countable or uncountable, depending on the context.

Thank you for playing Countable and Uncountable Nouns!